Star Wars: The Complete Saga (Episodes I-VI)

Actors: Harrison Ford, Ewan McGregor, Mark Hamill, Hayden Christensen, Carrie Fisher
Directors: George Lucas, Irvin Kershner, Richard Marquand
Format: Box set
Language English
Subtitles: English, French
Number of discs: 9
Classification: 12
Studio: 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
DVD Release Date: 12 Sep 2011

This nine-disc collection brings the wonder of the entire saga direct to your living room, where you can revisit all of your favourite Star Wars moments in gorgeous high definition and with pristine 6.1 DTS Surround Sound. Dive deeper into the universe with an unprecedented 40+ hours of special features, highlighted by never-before-seen content sourced from the Lucasfilm archives.

The comprehensive collection also features numerous deleted, extended and alternate scenes, new documentaries and a cross-section of the countless Star Wars spoofs that have appeared in pop culture over the past three decades.

Marking the first time ever that the full Saga is available in one complete collection, this Blu-ray box set also features a coveted peek into the making of the Saga with vintage documentaries, audio commentaries, behind-the-scenes moments, interviews, prop and costume turnarounds, retrospectives and more.

Disc One–Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace

  • Audio commentary with George Lucas, Rick McCallum, Ben Burtt, Rob Coleman, John Knoll, Dennis Muren and Scott Squires
  • Audio commentary from archival interviews with cast and crew
  • Languages: English audio description, Spanish, French, , Quebecois and Portuguese
  • Subtitles: English for the hard of hearing, Spanish, French, Quebecois, Dutch, Portuguese, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish / Commentary: English for the hard of hearing

Disc Two–Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones

  • Audio commentary with George Lucas, Rick McCallum, Ben Burtt, Rob Coleman, Pablo Helman, John Knoll and Ben Snow
  • Audio commentary from archival interviews with cast and crew
  • Languages: English audio description, Spanish, French, Quebecois and Portuguese
  • Subtitles: English for the hard of hearing, Spanish, French, Quebecois, Dutch, Portuguese, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish / Commentary: English for the hard of hearing

Disc Three–Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith

  • Audio commentary with George Lucas, Rick McCallum, Rob Coleman, John Knoll and Roger Guyett
  • Audio commentary from archival interviews with cast and crew
  • Languages: English audio description, Spanish, French, Quebecois and Portuguese
  • Subtitles: English for the hard of hearing, Spanish, French, Dutch, Portuguese, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish / Commentary: English for the hard of hearing

Disc Four–Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope

  • Audio commentary with George Lucas, Carrie Fisher, Ben Burtt and Dennis Muren
  • Audio commentary from archival interviews with cast and crew
  • Languages: English audio description, Spanish, French and Portuguese
  • Subtitles: English for the hard of hearing, Spanish, French, Dutch, Portuguese, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish / Commentary: English for the hard of hearing

Disc Five–Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back

  • Audio commentary with George Lucas, Irvin Kershner, Carrie Fisher, Ben Burtt and Dennis Muren
  • Audio commentary from archival interviews with cast and crew
  • Languages: English audio description, Spanish, French and Portuguese
  • Subtitles: English for the hard of hearing, Spanish, French, Dutch, Portuguese, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish / Commentary: English for the hard of hearing

Disc Six–Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi

  • Audio commentary with George Lucas, Carrie Fisher, Ben Burtt and Dennis Muren
  • Audio commentary from archival interviews with cast and crew
  • Languages: English audio description, Spanish, French and Portuguese
  • Subtitles: English for the hard of hearing, Spanish, French, Dutch, Portuguese, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish / Commentary: English for the hard of hearing

Disc Seven–Star Wars: Episodes I-III Archives

  • Including deleted, extended and alternate scenes
  • Prop, maquette and costume turnarounds
  • Matte paintings and concept art
  • Supplementary interviews with cast and crew
  • A flythrough of the Lucasfilm archives and more

Disc Eight–Star Wars: Episodes IV-VI Archives

  • Including deleted, extended and alternate scenes
  • Prop, maquette and costume turnarounds
  • Matte paintings and concept art
  • Supplementary interviews with cast and crew and more

Disc Nine–The Star Wars Documentaries

  • Star Warriors (2007, Approximately 84 minutes)–Some Star Wars fans want to collect action figures… these fans want to be action figures. A tribute to the 501st Legion, a global organisation of Star Wars costume enthusiasts, this insightful documentary shows how the super-fan club promotes interest in the films through charity and volunteer work at fundraisers and high-profile special events around the world.
  • A Conversation with the Masters: The Empire Strikes Back 30 Years Later (2010, Approximately 25 minutes)–George Lucas, Irvin Kershner, Lawrence Kasdan and John Williams look back on the making of The Empire Strikes Back in this in-depth retrospective from Lucasfilm created to help commemorate the 30th anniversary of the movie.
  • Star Wars Spoofs (2011, Approximately 91 minutes)–The farce is strong with this one. Enjoy a hilarious collection of Star Wars spoofs and parodies that have been created over the years, including outrageous clips from Family Guy, The Simpsons, How I Met Your Mother and more. And don’t miss “Weird Al” Yankovic’s one-of-a-kind music video tribute to The Phantom Menace.
  • The Making of Star Wars (1977, Approximately 49 minutes)–Learn the incredible behind-the-scenes story of how the original Star Wars movie was brought to the big screen in this fascinating documentary hosted by C-3PO and R2-D2. Includes interviews with George Lucas and appearances by Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher.
  • The Empire Strikes Back: SPFX (1980, Approximately 48 minutes)–Learn the secrets of making movies in a galaxy far, far away. Hosted by Mark Hamill, this revealing documentary offers behind-the-scenes glimpses into the amazing special effects that transformed George Lucas’ vision for Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back into reality.
  • Classic Creatures: Return of the Jedi (1983, Approximately 48 minutes)–Go behind the scenes–and into the costumes–as production footage from Return of the Jedi is interspersed with vintage monster movie clips in this in-depth exploration of the painstaking techniques utilised by George Lucas to create the classic creatures and characters seen in the film. Hosted and narrated by Carrie Fisher and Billie Dee Williams.
  • Anatomy of a Dewback (1997, Approximately 26 minutes)–See how some of the special effects in Star Wars became even more special two decades later. George Lucas explains and demonstrates how his team transformed the original dewback creatures from immovable rubber puppets (in the original 1977 release) to seemingly living, breathing creatures for the Star Wars 1997 Special Edition update.
  • Star Wars Tech (2007, Approximately 46 minutes)–Exploring the technical aspects of Star Wars vehicles, weapons and gadgetry, Star Wars Tech consults leading scientists in the fields of physics, prosthetics, lasers, engineering and astronomy to examine the plausibility of Star Wars technology based on science as we know it today.

Star Wars is an epic space film created by George Lucas. Over the decades, it has attracted quite a large fan base with its imaginative galaxy and creatures. Since the release of the first film, “Episode IV: A New Hope”, in 1977, it became a worldwide phenomenon. “Episode V: Empire Strikes Back” and “Episode VI: Return of the Jedi” were released in 1980 and 1983, respectively. Although there was a sixteen year gap between the last movie of the sequel trilogy and the first of the prequel trilogy, Stars Wars was so successful that it captured loyal fans who eagerly awaited the next three episodes. Of course, enough time had passed so that a whole new generation of fans began to discover the Star Wars phenomenon. Once more, the films were released with three-year intervals between each, starting in 1999 with “Episode I: The Phantom Menace” and followed by “Episode II: Attack of the Clones” and “Episode III: Revenge of the Sith” in 2002 and 2005, respectively.

Some may not know that George Lucas actually wrote all six episodes at once but later decided to make the last three films first. Although the sequel trilogy was easier and cheaper to make, this was not the main reason he released the series as such. If it were, he would have made the prequels much earlier rather than wait an additional sixteen years! Indeed, as George Lucas had intended, the special effects that were possible in the first three Episodes with the advancement of technology were magnificent, more realistic, and definitely worth waiting for. During the long interim between the film trilogies, however, the Star Wars phenomenon was kept alive through a whole range of media franchise including books, video game, television series, and comic books. Together, these became known as the Star Wars Expanded Universe because their storylines continued to extend the original fictional universe. Over the years, George Lucas has also used new special effects technologies for altering special edition and DVD/Blu-Ray releases. By 2008, Star Wars had earned roughly $4.41 billion dollars in box office revenue, making it the third-highest grossing film series after the widely successful Harry Potter and James Bond movies, respectively. In the same year, the first Star Wars film outside the original series hit theaters worldwide. Star Wars: Clone Wars was also meant to be the start of a new series for the Expanded Universe franchise. Unlike the others, this one is an animation film.

Star Wars takes place in a galaxy with many different types of planets and native species. With every planet, viewers meet the most unusual inhabitants, from grimy to cute, as George Lucas constantly introduces original species throughout the six episodes. Most alien creatures are humanoids and frequently appear in all Star Wars media. Robotic droids are also widespread and can be built to provide various services for their owners, from household chores to military functions. As a technologically advanced galaxy, transportation and communication is widely available. Plus, it is generally civilized as most planets are members of the Galactic Republic, an originally democratic union that is gradually manipulated into an autocracy and renamed the Galactic Empire as the Dark Force takes over. The “Force” is an omnipresent energy, which can only be harnessed by those with a natural ability, the Jedi. The “Force” is perhaps most popular concept among fans and is frequently used in phrases, such as “The Force is strong in this one”, which is used to determine who has the Jedi abilities, or “May the Force be with you” as a farewell. Jedi can gain abilities like mind control, and telekinesis, precognition, and many more supernatural abilities. They can also heighten physical facilities, like reflex and speed. There are various abilities that the Jedi can harness from the Force, but ultimately, each individual Jedi has his own natural skills as well as strengths and weaknesses. Generally, Jedi should be trained from a young age to be able to control the Force effectively. Although the Force has great powers that can be used for good deeds, it has an equally powerful dark side that is full of hatred and violence. In the film series, while the Jedi employ the Force to do good, the Sith uses it for his evil plot to manipulate and rule the galaxy. In the Expanded Universe, however, Dark Jedi are also featured because of the even more complex storylines of the galaxy.

 

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